Clinical Psychology Department

Systemic Psychotherapy / Family Therapy

Introduction

Systemic Psychotherapy is a form of therapy that sees psychological problems as emerging within a context of past and present relationships with others.

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It is generally offered to couples or families where it is considered useful or beneficial for the couple or family to be seen together. However individual sessions may also be offered and it may happen that only some members of a family attend therapy.

What happens in SYSTEMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY?

When one member of a couple or family experiences a difficulty this often affects their partner and/or others in the family. The way people relate and behave towards each other may change from what it previously was. For example, this might look something like the following: Click here

When a situation like this happens, a systemic therapist will work with you to understand each personís way of seeing the difficulty or problem. He or she will also explore in detail how each person feels about the situation, and how they have reacted to this.

Systemic psychotherapists sometimes work alone when seeing a couple or family or at other times will work with a small team (i.e. one or two co-therapists). This latter way of working is often useful as it allows multiple perspectives to be developed around a difficulty or problem a couple or family may have. Your therapist may also suggest things for you to do between sessions as part of psychotherapy. This may involve doing something differently in your day-to-day life or looking at something in a different way and reflecting on this.

A systemic therapist can work with most types of mental health, emotional or psychological difficulties.

Psychological treatment options :

1. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
2. Systemic Family Therapy
3. Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
4. Integrative Psychotherapy